Tag: Media

Media Wrap-Up

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Posted on by Emily Wright

We hope you enjoy this resource as an easy-access portal to all of our recent collaborations, interviews and publications. Kimberley O’Brien and the Quirky Kid team are committed to contribute to various publications and media outlets on topics of interest to parents and families alike.

2014

2015

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please contact us to schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.

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Quirky Kid and Panadol

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Dr. Kimberley O’Brien, our principal child psychologist  was engaged as an expert presenter during a campaign by Panadol. Her role  as an Expert independent presenter will be to share expert advice on managing parental anxiety at times of common illness in the family and soothing sick kids.

Kimberley will share her insights on the importance of having a plan and tools to help parents through common challenges, particularly of childhood illness. During the event, Kimberley will answer questions from the floor and attend to interviews.

About the survey

The event aims to share with the media a Global survey that finds parents need to short-circuit their own anxiety to better manage their child’s illness.

The survey suggests that parents manage day to day mishaps and mistakes calmly, but still get stressed about the important things like helping their children through illness.

The survey included responses from  more than 2,000 parents worldwide revealed the biggest parenting concern for parents is when their child is unwell. While 75% of Australian parents surveyed say they are very confident in treating their child’s pain or fever, 71% of Australian parents feel anxious about fever/temperature and 66% feel anxious about their child’s pain.

Kimberly O’Brien explains how this anxiety can impact children, emphasising the need for planning and coping strategies, and tools to help them through.

“Children are likely to vicariously experience stress when their parents are stressed. Even a change in facial expression or voice tone between parents may trigger stress responses in children, such as excessive crying, separation-anxiety and withdrawal,” says leading Australian child psychologist Dr Kimberley O’Brien.

“One of the most important things for parents is to have a plan, in case your child wakes with a temperature at three in the morning. Having tools in place to keep parents calm makes a big difference to sick children,” says Dr O’Brien.

Five Tips from Dr Kimberley O’Brien to managing your anxiety and soothe your sick child:

  1. Make a plan – This eliminates any indecision about how to best help a child in need. Remember to include distraction and calming tools if medication is required.
  2. Know your tools – A personalised DVD designed to soothe sick children, a favourite toy or game may relax children in need of medical intervention.
  3. Empathise – Try to see things from your child’s perspective to better understand their behaviour.
  4. Do familiar things – If possible, keep your usual family routines in place to maintain a sense of normality at home.
  5. Manage your anxiety – Call on your support networks and share the load of caring for your sick child. It will increase the quality of your care!

Children’s Panadol has created tools to help support parents in managing their child’s health and wellbeing including new, interactive and customisable apps to support in moments of common illness:

TV host and mother Shelley Craft (who will also be at the event) says “As a mother, sometimes I feel like I need to clone myself and be in two places at once – particularly when one of my kids is sick. A resource like Buddy Bear means you can distract and calm a toddler with a personalised story, giving you the chance to go and measure medicine, or even just take a moment to breathe.

You pop in their name and photo and choose from a list of common nursery rhymes for Buddy Bear to sing, so it really is a personalised video just for your child when they need it most,” says Shelley

Dr O’Brien observes “The positive finding from the Children’s Panadol Global Survey is that Australian parents are less concerned about the small mishaps we all have, in order to focus on the important things.”

When it comes to day-to-day mistakes, Australian parents appear to go easier on themselves than those in other countries, with 29 percent of Australian parents reporting feeling guilty if they forgot to do something for their child, compared with 41 percent across the international study. However 33 percent did admit to feeling disappointed in themselves if they forgot to do something for their child, and 44 percent worry about whether they are being a good parent (particularly mothers and those with babies).

The top three feelings about parenthood most reported by Australian parents were happy (73%), responsible (67%) and joyful (58%), however 51 per cent of all parents did admit to at least one negative feeling. “We know parental anxiety negatively impacts on children and this is amplified when they’re unwell.

Parents are encouraged to develop a routine with their child about managing unexpected illnesses. This ensures everyone knows the drill and will alleviate stress for both parent and child,” says Dr O’Brien.

About the Survey:

An online survey of 2,150 parents internationally – including Australia (n=400), Colombia (n=400), Indonesia (n=400), Philippines (n=400), Romania (n=400), Saudi Arabia (n=150) – was commissioned by GSK, the makers of Children’s Panadol, and conducted in December 2015 by independent research organisation Lightspeed

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Real Needs Community Grants

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

The Quirky Kid clinic and our Principal Child Psychologists Kimberley O’Brien are proud to partner with Real Insurance and the Real Needs program as the Judges for grants of  totalling 1 Million for non-for-profit projects. 

Kimberley O’Brien said, “Early support for children, whether physical or mental, is crucial for their development as they mature and become a more active part of our society. The effects of neglecting the needs of our youth, if not addressed, will have a profound effect on Australia’s social and economic well-being through the current century.

“There should never be barriers to children receiving the essential services that many of these charities provide. It’s great to see a company like Real Insurance connecting with the community in this way and making a real difference to the lives of Australian children in need.”

The Real Needs Program launches in April 2015, with grants of differing values of $5,000, $10,000 and $20,000 available. These grants will be awarded to Not-For-Profit organisations who demonstrate innovative approaches for how the funding will be used to support youth programs. Real Insurance staff will also have the opportunity to vote for their preferred charity to receive a monthly $5,000 ‘Staff Choice’ grant.

The program comes as a result from a New research, commissioned by Real Insurance, that reveals that Aussies mistakenly consider themselves to be among the best globally at caring for the community. Over half of the country (57%) believes that Australia is well above average when it comes to looking after disadvantaged people in the community, however, over three quarters (77%) underestimate the number of children in need requiring welfare in Australia, according to Galaxy research commissioned by Real Insurance.

The findings reveal the most concerning societal issues affecting children that trouble the community. These range from concerns about homelessness amongst children (48%) and children affected by domestic violence (76%), to excessive use of mobile phones and the internet by children (51%).

The research also showed that over three quarters (76%) of Australians believe there should be more support for children in key areas such as providing increased educational support (77%), counselling (56%), health care (54%) and food services (45%).

In the interest of giving back to the community, Real Insurance is today launching its new grants program, Real Needs, to help support children in need across Australia. With $1 million being put towards this initiative, Real Needs is encouraging Not-For-Profit organisations working with children in need to apply for charitable funding which will enable them to address the growing issues faced by Australia’s youth.

To be eligible for a Real Needs 2015 grant, Not-for-Profit organisations must support children up to the age of 18 years and be a registered charity, community group or service, sporting club or hospital community program.

Apply

To find out more or apply for a grant from Real Needs, please visit http://realneeds.realinsurance.com.au or contact contact@realneeds.com.au.

About Real Needs

Real Needs is a community grants program launched by Real Insurance. It encourages Not-For-Profit organisations working with children to apply for charitable funding, which will enable them to further aid youth in need. Real Needs aims to make a positive difference by providing charities with grants that assist them to manage programs that help children in need across Australia.

About Real Insurance

Real Insurance entered the Australian market in 2005 with a goal to protect the quality of people’s lives and to make insurance simple and easy to understand. We’ve held to this promise with a range of real, value-for-money insurance products, including life, home, car, pet, funeral and income insurance, as well as staff that provide real, high quality service for our customers. In addition to our quality products, we now believe our real point of difference is our commitment to Australian families and our pledge to protect their wellbeing, as well as the assets and financial security they have worked hard to create.

About Quirky Kid

The Quirky Kid Clinic is Australia’s leading Child, Adolescent and Family Psychology Clinic based in Sydney and Wollongong (Austinmer). Our experienced team of educational and developmental psychologists, social developers and youth mentors are motivated and inspired by our daily interactions with children, adolescents and families.

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Sex Education @ The Morning Show

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley O’Brien, our principal child psychologist was invited to discuss sex education and how parents  and school can best approach this. Kimberley was called into the studio in a bit of a rush joining in hallway into the segment! Here is a fact-sheet about the subject we prepared earlier: https://childpsychologist.com.au/resources/by-issue/sex-education

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please contact us to schedule a time.Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media. View our media appearances to-date.

Video Game Addiction @ The Morning Show

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley O’Brien, our principal child psychologist was invited to discuss video game addiction and how parents  and school can best approach this.  Here is a fact-sheet about the subject we prepared earlier: https://childpsychologist.com.au/resources/children-and-video-games

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please contact us to schedule a time.Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media. View our media appearances to-date.