Tag: Behaviour

Positive Parent-Child Relationships

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

We are proud to announce the publication of Kimberley O’Brien and Jane Mosco’s book chapter on Positive Parent-Child Relationships by Springer press. The book, Positive Relationships, was compiled by Dr. Sue Roffey.

Kimberley is our Principal Child Psychologist.

This highly accessible book takes a positive psychology approach to explore why healthy relationships are important for resilience, mental health and peaceful communities, how people learn relationships and what helps in developing the positive.

The abstract is as follow:

Practitioners working in child and family psychology typically hear about the challenges of problematic parent–child relationships. A positive psychology approach, however, identifies what is effective in fostering family resilience and facilitating optimal parent–child relationships (Suldo SM, Parent-Child Relationships. In Gilman R, Huebner ES, and Furlong MJ (eds) Handbook of positive psychology in schools. Routledge, New York, 2009).
Drawing on this perspective, this chapter summarises the literature, exploring different parenting styles and effective parenting strategies. We also outline changes in the parent–child relationship from birth through infancy, childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. We also consider the impact of alternative carers and cultural diversity with reference to mutually rewarding parent–child connections and increased child well-being.
The publication of this title coincides with launch of the Quirky Kid Tickets – a Tool to tame Behaviour – a resource that aims to improve parent-child relationship
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Tickets – a tool to tame behaviour

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

We are proud to introduce our newest innovation – The Quirky Kid Tickets!  Parents have been asking for and we are proud to introduce our effective behaviour management tool as recommended by Kimberley O’Brien, Child Psychologist.

The Quirky Kid Tickets - A Tool to Tame Behaviour

Tickets are a complete reward system encouraging you and your child to work together to manage behaviour.

You start by setting clear, achievable goals together. Follow this up with lots of direct praise when you see your child achieve the goal. Finally, watch the surprise reward appear before your eyes as they scratch their Tickets to reveal fun and creative activities you can all share in.

‘Tickets’ is the latest resource to come from the creatives minds at the Quirky Kid Clinic. An inventive and cooperative tool for managing your child’s behaviour.

It is simple:

– Set a goal
– Give your child a ticket to acknowledge when the goal is achieved
– When your child collects enough tickets, he/she gets to scratch and win!
– Lastly, enjoy the fun and interactive reward activities together!

The Sunday Telegraph completed an article about our resource. You can read about it on The Telegraph online.

Visit the Quirky Kid Shoppe for more information on the Tickets and other unique Therapeutic and developmental resources for children and families.

We love therapeutic resources and go to great lengths to personally develop and produce our hand-packed kits. We are committed to providing parents and professionals around the world with creative and effective therapeutic tools that are tried, tested and loved in classrooms, clinics and lounge rooms around the globe.

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ASD and Repetitive Behaviour

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are lifelong developmental disabilities characterised by marked difficulties in social interaction, impaired communication, restricted and repetitive interests/behaviours, and sensory sensitivities.

It is called a spectrum disorder as each child may be affected in a different way. The severity of the disorder can range from mild to severe, and includes Autism, Asperger’s syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder – Not otherwise Specified.

Repetitive behaviours are a core component of the diagnosis of autism, and they form an important part of early identification.

Typical Development of Repetitive Behaviours

  • Infants – often demonstrate repetitive behaviours including kicking, waving, banging, twirling, bouncing and rocking. These behaviours however, reduce after 12 months.
  • 24 – 36 months – compulsive like behaviours including preference for sameness begin to emerge.
  • 4 years – decrease in all repetitive behaviours. By the time a child reaches school age there are usually relatively few repetitive behaviours to be seen.

Repetitive Behaviours in a child diagnosed with an ASD

The amount and frequency of repetitive behaviours seen in a child diagnosed with an ASD is significantly higher than that seen in children without an ASD diagnosis. There are also differences in the types of repetitive behaviour demonstrated in autism and typical development.
Young children with autism are more likely to engage in

  • body rocking,
  • finger flicking,
  • hand flapping,
  • mouthing,
  • unusual posturing.

Recent studies have shown that a combination of therapies that aim to increase receptive language and improve social skills, can reduce the occurrence of repetitive behaviours.

Need more information?

Quirky Kid is registered to provide services under the Helping Children with Austins – FaCHSIA.

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Information for this fact sheet was taken from an interview with Child Psychologist Kimberley O’Brien, the Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorder Workshop attended by Corina Vogler, Provisional Psychologist  and the following articles:

Honey, E., McConachie, H., Randle, Val., Shearer, H., & Le Couteur, A. S. (2008). One-year Change in Repetitive Behaviours in Young Children with Communication Disorders Including Autism. Journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38, 1439–1450.

Honey, E., Leekham, S., & McConachie, H.. (2007). Repetitive Behaviours and Play in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37, 1107–1115.

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Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Corina Vogler, Provisional Psychologist at the Quirky Kid Clinic attended a workshop on Repetitive Behaviours in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at The Melbourne University, Victoria.

This workshop was presented by Professor Margot Prior, University of Melbourne and Ms. Josephine Barbaro, La Trobe University. The workshop explored the nature, type, and triggers of repetitive behaviours common to children with an ASD.  This was followed by a discussion on how these behaviours can be managed, for the better development of the child and to reduce the impact on families.

Corina has since then presented the workshop to the Quirky Kid team as part of our knowledge management and knowledge sharing program.

If you feel that your child may be displaying repetitive behaviours or if you would like any further information about Autism Spectrum Disorder, please contact us, or visit our resources pages.

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Sensory Seeking

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Jacqui Olsson attended a workshop on Sensory Processing and its links with behaviour on Wednesday, 25th November 2009. This workshop examined the link between children’s behaviour, their ability to process sensory information and to understand their world and communicate, and provided loads of helpful strategies to assist children in play activities, staying calm and independently managing their own behaviour.

If you feel your child may have some sensory processing difficulties, you may consider the Sensory Profile to identify their sensory strengths and weaknesses.  Please contact us if you would like more information on managing your child’s behaviour.

Quirky Kid Clinic.

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