Performance Psychology For Kids

No Comments

Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Winner of 2014 Educational Publisher Award

While Australia’s elite sportsmen are aiming for top form in the footy finals, young Australians are also striving to achieve their best: It’s now the ‘business end’ of the year, when kids take to the field in sports finals, school students knuckle down to study for final exams, and young performers prepare for end-of-year eisteddfods.

But how to get the most out of high achievers without overdoing it? A new resource from one of Australia’s leading child psychology practices, The Quirky Kid Clinic™ helps young people perform at their best while maintaining balance and perspective, and not getting burnt out.

‘Power Up!’ is a step-by-step program that enables schools and clubs to adopt the type of performance psychology used by elite athletes, performers and musicians. Young people striving to perform at high levels in sports, performance, music or academia (including the end of year exams) can benefit from these techniques. They include goal setting, self-talk, imagery, arousal regulation, focus and competition planning.

Quirky Kid Clinic’s principal child Psychologist, Kimberly O’Brien says: “Know- ing how to reach your performance peak is more effective than endless hours of coaching. Power Up! is about avoiding burnout and enjoying what you do best”.

Power Up! will be distributed by the Australian Council of Educational Research. ACER’s National Sales Manager Eirini Lamni says the program is an “innovation in the way we approach high performing kids. By focusing on the path towards goals rather than just the end-point, young people are armed with useful, healthy strategies to perform at their best. It’s an excellent resource.”

Power Up! was lauched on the 26th of September at the Sydney Academy of Sport and Recreation, in partnership with Football United. Football United organizes soccer matches, tournaments and camps, providing opportunities for young refugees, or kids from disadvantaged backgrounds to socialise, form networks, and to excel on the sports field.

Power Up! was recently awarded the Best Student Resource (Primary) in the Arts/Humanities category of the 2014 Educational Publishing Awards.

In the words of the judges at the recent 2014 Educational Publishing Awards, Power Up!…

“… is unique in its approach in helping students enhance performance to achieve success by identifying and improving cognitive strategies. Clearly presented, well designed and practical in its application, it delivers contemporary and relatable video content.”

View some pictures of the launch event on our Facebook Page
More information about Power Up! is available at http://powerup.quirkykid.com.au
To register to a workshop visit our workshop registration page

Buy Power Up Now

// <![CDATA[
document.getElementById(‘ShopifyEmbedScript‘) || document.write(”);
// ]]>
&lt;span class=”mceItemHidden”&gt;&amp;lt;a href=”https://qk-shoppe-au.myshopify.com/cart/694614207:1″ target=”_blank”&amp;gt;Buy Power Up: Give your child the skills to &lt;span class=”hiddenSuggestion” pre=”to “&gt;perform&lt;/span&gt; at their best&amp;lt;/a&amp;gt;&lt;/span&gt;

Top 4 Tips for young performers:

  1. Don’t put all your eggs in one basketAlthough you might feel like you should do nothing but train or practice it actually won’t do you any favours regarding your performance. You are much more than just your athletic talent or creative ability. Remember to develop yourself as a whole person and keep your studies, job, social life and family relationships as normal as possible.
  2. Use setbacks as opportunities for learningThere is no doubt that reaching the elite or professional level as a teenager means that you have a lot of talent! You can make every experience count, even if your performance was dismal! Take note of your strengths and identify your weaknesses, and then set about learning from your mistakes.
  3. Don’t buy into the hype!

    Athletes and performers who achieve long-term success usually stay well grounded, keeping everything in perspective. Work with your coaches, teachers, agents, psychologist or media trainer to feel confident and in control in the public arena.
  4. Look after yourself

    You dedicate a significant amount of time and effort to train and practice to achieve success and reach your potential, however like everyone else; you can become ill or injured. Make sure your decisions are keeping your long-term future in mind as well as your present needs. Always consult with medical professionals when making decisions about coming back from illness or injury.

For more tips visit: https://childpsychologist.com.au/resources/young-athletes-and-performersdocument.currentScript.parentNode.insertBefore(s, document.currentScript);

Advertisement

Leave a Reply