Tag: Separation

Confidentiality in Separation and Divorce

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

** INFORMATION IS OUTDATED AND CURRENTLY UNDER REVIEW **

The Australian Psychological Society has recently produced the Guidelines for working with young people, to assist psychologists working in the complex area of child and adolescent mental health. The following questions and answers present the key legal and ethical considerations for psycholigsts working with young people and are based on extracts from these new guidelines.

Is the consent of both parents required before a psychologist can provide services to a child?

When a psychologist is engaged to provide a psychological service to a child, the consent and involvement of both parents is desirable, although not legally required. However, there are situations where obtaining the consent of both parents is not possible, or appropriate.

What about parental consent where the parents of the child are separated?

If a psychologist is aware that the parents of the child are separated, he or she may assume that the parent who organised the consultation has the legal authority to access a psychologist on behalf of the child. Even if there are existing Court Orders, the psychologist is not required to establish whether the decision to consult a psychologist has been made jointly by the parents.

If the presenting parent says that they do not wish the other parent to be involved, and the other parent reportedly opposes the decision for the child to see a psychologist, the psychologist should discuss this further with the presenting parent and child, and make a professional judgement about whether to provide services. In making that decision, the best interests of the child are most important.

Where parents are separated, what if the other parent seeks information from the psychologist about the services being provided to the child?

If the presenting parent and child have not given consent for disclosure of information to the other parent, then a psychologist must protect the confidentiality of the young person. This includes refraining from acknowledging if a psychological service has been provided at all. If the other parent does contact the psychologist for information, the presenting parent will be informed and encouraged to resolve the issues directly.

What are the limits to confidentiality when providing services to young people?

Psychologists must comply with any legal requirements to report child abuse and neglect. Psychologists must also disclose information in situations where failure to disclose information may result in clear risk to the young person or to others, in order to avert risk.

You can contact us for further information or to make an appointment.

Separation and Divorce workshop for children in Sydney.
In addition, we also run the ‘Doing the Splits’ workshop. Visit the workshop pages to make a booking:

– https://childpsychologist.com.au/workshop/doing-the-splits-sydney

Separation and Divorce workshop for children in Melbourne.

– https://childpsychologist.com.au/workshop/doing-the-splits-melbourne

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Heavenly Creatures @ The Sunday Magazine

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley discussed how to help your children deal with the death of a pet with Vanessa Murray from The Sunday Telegraph’s Sunday Magazine. You can find out more information about grief and loss in children by visiting our resources page on grief and loss or discussing it on our forum.

The full interview is available on the Sunday Telegraph website.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please contact us to schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.

New Boyfriend @ Essential Baby

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley discussed  the question of a single mother and her new boyfriend with Justine Davies from Essential baby forums.  You can find out more information about trust, separation and divorce, responsibility and adolescent parenting tips by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

Kimberley’s main recommendations were:

  • “If you don’t envisage this as being a long-term relationship, then there are no benefits to be gained in introducing your boyfriend into your children’s lives,” she says. “Ideally you want to have a solid relationship of at least six months, with long-term prospects, before you involve your kids. Otherwise you risk your daughters becoming attached to this person, only for him to disappear suddenly down the track. This could trigger again the grief and loss that they would have experienced when your relationship with their Dad broke down”
  • “The first time that children experience loss they will be hurting, but they will also be confused about what is happening. The second time though they won’t be confused because they have already experienced it and they know that they don’t like it. So the sense of grief can be even greater. It doesn’t necessarily have to be the loss of a father–figure; it could be a favourite uncle going overseas for a while, or a grandparent moving away. But introducing them to a short-term boyfriend is setting them up for grief for no good reason.”

The full interview is available on the Essential Baby Website.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.} else {

Divorce and Children @ Sunrise

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Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley discussed the impact of divorce on children with presenters of  from the Sunrise on Channel 7. You can find out more about the problems associated with separation and divorce  and strategies to better deal with it by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

The full interview is available below:

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments
with the media.