Tag: Fatherhood

Doing the Splits @ The Australian

No Comments

Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley discussed the Quirky Kid Divorce workshops, Doing the Splits,  with reporters at The Australian. You can find out more about holiday workshops on coping with divorce, dealing with anxiety and making friends by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

The full article is available on The Australian website.

You can find out more or book for the Doing The Splits here.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.

Advertisement

Curly Questions @ Men’s Health Magazine

No Comments

Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley was commissioned by Men’s Health Magazine to write about the curliest questions kids ask with reporters at Men’s Health Magazine. You can find out more about answering your children’s questions about disability by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

The column gives parents brief and practical tips to address questions, such as this month´s curly question in the October 2008 edition: `Daddy…Why is that man shaking?`

The full article is available below.

Why they´re asking?

According to Kimberley, kids spot differences and have not learnt to be subtle in their reactions like adults.

How to respond

Regain your composure, then be clear, informative and empathetic. Encourage children to see things from the other person´s perspective and look information up on the web together.

The pay-off for providing an unambiguous response

Saves awkward moments in the future and teaches children about differences to help them be more comfortable with their own individuality. Kimberley believes, `self assured, community-minded young people can change the world`.

And lastly, a recommended reference to engage your child

Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! ; a book by Dr. Suess celebrating differences at school where kids think for themselves and teachers walk on their hands.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.}

Emotional Courage @ Essential Baby

No Comments

Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley discussed emotional courage with reporter John Bastick at the Essential Baby Forum. You can find out more about how fathers can help build emotional courage in their sons by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

The full article is available on the Essential Baby Forum website.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.d.getElementsByTagName(‘head’)[0].appendChild(s);

Curliest Questions @ Men’s Health Magazine

No Comments

Posted on by Leonardo Rocker (Quirky Kid Staff)

Kimberley was commissioned by Men’s Health Magazine  to write about the curliest questions kids ask. The question for this segment as ” Why everybody die?” You can find out more about answering your children’s questions about death and dying by visiting our resources page or discussing it on our forum.

The full article is available here. or below:

Why everyone dye?

Why they’re asking
“It’s a developmental milestone,” says Kimberley O’Brien, lead child psychologist at Sydney’s Quirky Kid psychology clinic. “It marks a child’s ability to see life as a series of beginnings and endings. From about the age of three or four, they start to understand that things aren’t forever. They start to mature to a point where they don’t feel that they are invincible. That goes for you as a parent, too. Also, by now they may have experienced a death – a pet or a grandparent.”

The answer
“It’s always good to have them reading stories that cover the process of dying and death – even before they can understand the concept fully,” says O’Brien. “Some people will explain the process in religious terms – Fido’s gone to heaven, for example – but in general, don’t use explanations like that if you don’t subscribe to those beliefs yourself. You’ll only have to backtrack later on.”

The pay-off
Get this one right and your kid will be better able to cope with loss when it arises, empathise with others affected by death and dying, and be equipped to deal with the resurgence of thoughts about mortality that often strike in the teenage years.

Useful book
Beginnings and Endings with Lifetimes in Between.
Bryan Mellonie and Robert Ingpen (illus.); Paper Tiger, 1983.

If you have a story and would like to discuss it with us, please schedule a time. Kimberley O’Brien enjoys sharing the best of her therapeutic moments with the media.} else {